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aseaofquotes:

Catherynne M. Valente, Deathless

aseaofquotes:

Catherynne M. Valente, Deathless

posted 1 day ago on 07/22/14 via barnarding · © aseaofquotes
2,616 notes

queenrhaenyra:

→ R E M E M B E R   T H I S   W H E N  Y O U   A R E   Q U E E N

posted 3 days ago on 07/20/14 via queenrhaenyra
283 notes

"You can either be executed, or you can be Commander Ambrose’s new food taster. His last taster died recently, and we need to fill the position."


“When I say forever,’ Koschei whispered, ‘I mean until the black death of the world. An Ivan means just the present moment, the flickering light of it, in a green field, his mouth on yours. He means the stretching of that moment. But forever isn’t bright; it isn’t like that. Forever is cold and hard and final.” 

—Catherynne M. Valente, Deathless

posted 4 days ago on 07/19/14 via queenmorinth · © mythandrists
1,604 notes

solesoffire:

literature meme | short stories 1/8
The Yellow Wallpaper is a 6,000-word short story by the American writer Charlotte Perkins Gilman, first published in January 1892 in The New England Magazine. It is regarded as an important early work of American feminist literature, illustrating attitudes in the 19th century toward women’s physical and mental health.
Presented in the first person, the story is a collection of journal entries written by a woman whose physician husband has confined her to the upstairs bedroom of a house he has rented for the summer. She is forbidden from working and has to hide her journal from him, so she can recuperate from what he calls a “temporary nervous depression – a slight hysterical tendency,” a diagnosis common to women in that period. The windows of the room are barred, and there is a gate across the top of the stairs, allowing her husband to control her access to the rest of the house. (x)

I really have discovered something at last.Through watching so much at night, when it changes so, I have finally found out.The front pattern does move—and no wonder! The woman behind shakes it! Sometimes I think there are a great many women behind, and sometimes only one, and she crawls around fast, and her crawling shakes it all over.Then in the very bright spots she keeps still, and in the very shady spots she just takes hold of the bars and shakes them hard.And she is all the time trying to climb through. But nobody could climb through that pattern—it strangles so; I think that is why it has so many heads. They get through, and then the pattern strangles them off and turns them upside down, and makes their eyes white! If those heads were covered or taken off it would not be half so bad. 
read full

solesoffire:

literature meme | short stories 1/8

The Yellow Wallpaper is a 6,000-word short story by the American writer Charlotte Perkins Gilman, first published in January 1892 in The New England Magazine. It is regarded as an important early work of American feminist literature, illustrating attitudes in the 19th century toward women’s physical and mental health.

Presented in the first person, the story is a collection of journal entries written by a woman whose physician husband has confined her to the upstairs bedroom of a house he has rented for the summer. She is forbidden from working and has to hide her journal from him, so she can recuperate from what he calls a “temporary nervous depression – a slight hysterical tendency,” a diagnosis common to women in that period. The windows of the room are barred, and there is a gate across the top of the stairs, allowing her husband to control her access to the rest of the house. (x)

I really have discovered something at last.Through watching so much at night, when it changes so, I have finally found out.The front pattern does move—and no wonder! The woman behind shakes it! Sometimes I think there are a great many women behind, and sometimes only one, and she crawls around fast, and her crawling shakes it all over.Then in the very bright spots she keeps still, and in the very shady spots she just takes hold of the bars and shakes them hard.
And she is all the time trying to climb through. But nobody could climb through that pattern—it strangles so; I think that is why it has so many heads. They get through, and then the pattern strangles them off and turns them upside down, and makes their eyes white! If those heads were covered or taken off it would not be half so bad.

read full

posted 1 week ago on 07/10/14 via laughtersilvered · © solesoffire
2,942 notes

"

A woman who hates you is playing the pianoforte.

You have five hundred a year. From who? Five hundred what? No one knows. No one cares. You have it. It’s yours. Every year. All five hundred of it.

A charming man attempts to flirt with you. This is terrible.

You are in a garden, and you are astonished.

"
posted 2 weeks ago on 07/06/14 via serindrana · © agonyandagony
22,231 notes

  • Me: But I have about fifty books at home I haven't read, there's no reason for me to buy these.
  • My brain: Okay, but consider this: more books.

"The iPod, like the Walkman cassette player before it, allows us to listen to our music wherever we want. Previously, recording technology had unlinked music from the concert hall, the café, and the saloon, but now music can always be carried with us. Michael Bull, who has written frequently about the impact of the Walkman and the iPod, points out that we often use devices to ‘aestheticize urban space.’ We carry our own soundtrack with us wherever we go, and the world around us is overlaid with our music. Our whole life becomes a movie, and we can alter the score for it over and over again: one minute it’s a tragedy, and the next it’s an action film. Energetic, dreamy, or ominous and dark: everyone has their own private movie going on in their heads, and no two are the same….Theodor Adorno… called this situation ‘accompanied solitude,’ a situation where we might be alone, but we have the ability via music to create the illusion that we are not."
— from How Music Works, by David Byrne (via girlfromtralfamadore)

nevver:

When Science Fiction became Fact (larger)

posted 1 month ago on 06/23/14 via cptprocrastination · © io9.com
6,370 notes

"We can never be gods, after all—but we can become something less than human with frightening ease."
N.K. Jemisin, The Hundred Thousand Kingdoms (via larmoyante)
posted 1 month ago on 06/19/14 via carrionkings · © larmoyante
6,633 notes

lazybookreviews:

I cannot…describe what Mallory has done to an already terrifying book:

“Can you take someone else’s Real,” he asked, “or are you stuck getting it on your own?”

The Skin Horse looked at the Rabbit then.

“What I mean is,” the Rabbit said carefully. “If something else was already Real. Could you take it from them, and keep it for yourself.”

“No,” the Skin Horse said, and his voice was a crawling black thing across the floor. “You can’t take Real from another toy.”

But the Rabbit wasn’t finished. “Can you take the Real out of a boy? Can you take his heart in your own self and leave him with a sawdust heart on the nursery floor in your place?”

And the Skin Horse did not say anything.

“I suppose you are real?” said the Rabbit. And the Skin Horse was afraid for the first time in a long time.

posted 1 month ago on 05/30/14 via knitmeapony · © lazybookreviews
2,109 notes

lalalichan:

- the abhorsen’s bells -

i’m a really big fan of Garth Nix’s trilogy ‘Abhorsen’. more to come!

posted 2 months ago on 05/14/14 via kaijuhearmenow · © lalalichan
367 notes

"Lolita is not about love, because love is always mutual; Lolita is about obsession, which is never, ever love, and Nabokov himself was so disappointed that people did not understand this and take away the right message… For how could anyone call this feeding frenzy of selfishness, devouring, and destruction “love”?"
—  In her preface to LOLITA, Mary Gaitskill reflects on a review by Vanity Fair’s Gregor von Rezzori in which he calls the novel: “The only convincing love story of the century (via dollymyfolly)
posted 2 months ago on 05/10/14 via rudegod · © dollymyfolly
42,897 notes

rainbowrowell:

emma-tobias:

Attachements. By Rainbow Rowell. 
By me. 


Ah. This is SERIOUSLY lovely.

rainbowrowell:

emma-tobias:

Attachements. By Rainbow Rowell. 

By me. 

Ah. This is SERIOUSLY lovely.

posted 2 months ago on 05/06/14 via bexlogic · © emma-tobias
425 notes

"Keys did not really fascinate him, though he collected them as well, matching them carefully, not to the lock that was made for them, modern to modern, brass to brass, keycard to slot, as a common locksmith might, but to the ones he felt they yearned for, deep in their pressed metal hearts. He possessed a rusted iron key with an ornate lion’s grimace at its head, slung alongside a gleaming hotel’s card-slot lock, its red and green lights dead. He had laid an everyday steel housekey against the rarest of locks, real gold, with lilies raised up on its surface, a complex system of bolts and tumblers concealed within. Only Oleg had heard their cries for each other. Only Oleg knew their silent grief that they could not join."
Palimpsest // Catherynne M. Valente
posted 2 months ago on 05/01/14 via lewn-atic · © apleasureto-burn
9 notes